Get the Look

Vogue inspiration – Sally Gabori

Photographed literally out of the pages of a Vogue magazine, this article celebrates the life and artistic contribution of Ann Lewis AO, art collector, patron and gallerist, prior to her collection being dispersed or sold at auction. It was the extraordinary Sally Gabori’s that grabbed my eye – three spectacular pieces hung vertically across a red wall, in a relatively small room – real wow factor at work. Apparently Ann liked to rotate her artworks throughout her home every six weeks or so, with a major re-hang every three months – she felt that it kept her eye fresh and her spirit uplifted.

A lesson in minimalism

I have just completed hanging a number of paintings into a client’s recently refurbished home. Everything looks very shiny and new, awaiting that unique patina that living gives it. The space will definitely mellow and soften with time.

Aboriginal Walpiri artist Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s bold black and white painting titled “Tingari”, 1500mm x 2000mm balances the strongly striped Robyn Cosgrove rug and compliments the charcoal patterns and textures of the couch cushions.

Mixing it up!

My client at Church Point recently purchased this beautiful painting by Kudditji Kngwarreye from me. It measures 700 × 1500mm, a little small to command an entire wall and too big to hang between doors or at the end of a corridor. After experimenting with a few spots, we found the perfect place at the top of the stairs – the dramatic impact of turning the corner and seeing it, spot lit from above, brings a really fresh energy to the space.

In a very clever twist, my client then hung other works along side the painting to create an entire gallery wall of diverse and interesting pieces, each one different but brought together by the common thread of the colour blue!!

BREAKFAST POINT SHOWCASES ABORIGINAL ARTWORKS

Posted by Karen Lange on September 09, 2011
I have recently installed a number of Aboriginal paintings into the new display penthouse at Breakfast Point, on the banks of the Parramatta River in Sydney.
The latest development for Rose Group, the penthouse, part of the Verandah’s complex, was styled by my colleagues at Fanuli Furniture and I was asked to adorn the walls with beautiful contemporary Aboriginal Artworks.
Rather fittingly, Breakfast Point was named by Captain John Hunter in 1788 when he put ashore to make tea and have refreshments. On the same day, it is believed he experienced his first sighting of local Aboriginals on a neighbouring island.

 

  

KUDDITJI KNGWARREYE STOPS TRAFFIC!

A stunning work by Kudditji Kngwarreye hanging in the window at Macleay on Manning – one of Sydney’s most beautiful boutique retailers in Potts Point.

Commanding an entire wall of this eclectic elegant retailer, the painting, measuring 1500 × 2400mm, epitomizes how relevant and contemporary Aboriginal art is in the life of the city today.

A SLIGHT, BUT BEAUTIFUL DEVIATION

Being an Aboriginal art addict can mean that non-indigenous work does not always get a look in!!
However the moment I met “China Boy” a highly pixelated black and white photograph by nationally acclaimed photographer Michelle Aboud, I know that we were destined to be together.
“China Boy” is sixth in a limited edition series of six photos printed onto canvas. Measuring 1450 x1450mmm square (approx) he is a striking and fitting companion to the Aborignal works by Kudditji Kngwareyye, Minnie Pwerle, Dorothy Napangardi, Barney Campbell Tjakamarra and others, that adorn my walls.
However there is an ora of innocence and charm about this boy, achieved not just by capturing a single moment in time, but also by the pixelation process of bringing together thousands of different sized individual black dots to create a work of art. At close range, the photograph reminds me of one of Dorothy Napangardi’s paintings, yet when you squint slightly, it is a fully integrated black and white photo
of “China Boy”.
Having just read “The Hare with Amber Eyes” by Edmund de Waal, I would love to know more about this small child – where he is from, what is he looking at, what has captured his attention.

Textural harmony created using minimal palette

Fanuli Furniture, Cremorne, NSW showcase the work of Barney Campbell Tjakamarra in an exquisite manner by layering luxurious texture upon texture, to create a sophisticated, elegant vignette of calmness.

Indonesian inspired Ikat fabric cushions sit on a raw linen textured sofa, with the shot silk curtains bringing a spark of life and vitality, without disturbing the peace!

Barney Campbell Tjakamarra’s Tingari painting measures 1200 x 2000mm and has been beautifully executed in a monochromatic rich cream colour.

Art in situ

Within the next couple of weeks I will be launching my new business artplacement.com.au (website coming soon)

Faced with the enviable problem of an abundance of beautiful Aboriginal art and not enough walls, our new business, artplacement.com.au caters to Australian companies wishing to avail themselves of magnificent indigenous art, without huge capital expenditure.  All the works are gallery quality, selected specifically for each space by our Interior Designer. Paintings are rotated on a regular basis or hung for longer rental periods – for a fraction of the price of purchasing art, companies get the pleasure and stimulation of living with beautiful art and the actual rental is tax deductible. Watch this space!

The image above shows how Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s expansive Fire Dreaming, measuring 1500 x 2000mm, can transform a space from being a typical partitioned office lay-out, into an energetic, vibrant working environment. In the adjacent foyer area, Emily Pwerle’s Awelye or Body Paint hangs above the public seating area, creating an immediately welcoming ambiance for visitors and staff alike.

Until the site is up and running, please contact me via my blog to discuss how artplacement can help you with your art rental needs. If your company is based in Sydney, we offer clients a complimentary site visit by our Interior Designer as part of our service.

Glorious Gloria

For some years now, Aboriginal Art Interiors and Orient House of Glebe NSW have enjoyed a symbiotic relationship – I hang my art on their walls and it truly compliments their range of wonderful African and Asian artifacts and furniture. This picture illustrates how tribal objects work so well together, wherever they originate from. Set against a deep tobacco coloured wall, “Leaves” by artist Gloria Petyarre, employing a minimal cream and white palette, compliments the raw boldness of an African mask and the aged patina of an antique chinese alter table.

Orient House embraces Australia’s tribal reference

Emily Pwerle Body Paint hanging at Orient House in Glebe – sitting pretty along side artifacts and Objet D’Art from China and Africa.

The Aboriginal art looks extraordinary amongst glorious furniture items and collectables from Africa, China, 
Indonesia and the South Pacific. There is such a common thread between the tribal aesthetics of each region and the resonance of the art, which sits beautifully with it. Of course the magic styling ever present within the showroom, creates such surprising cameos of colour and texture, sure to excite!!