Monthly Archives: October 2013

Vogue inspiration – Sally Gabori

Photographed literally out of the pages of a Vogue magazine, this article celebrates the life and artistic contribution of Ann Lewis AO, art collector, patron and gallerist, prior to her collection being dispersed or sold at auction. It was the extraordinary Sally Gabori’s that grabbed my eye – three spectacular pieces hung vertically across a red wall, in a relatively small room – real wow factor at work. Apparently Ann liked to rotate her artworks throughout her home every six weeks or so, with a major re-hang every three months – she felt that it kept her eye fresh and her spirit uplifted.

The perfect Tingari by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

When my colleague told me that Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was working with him, the timing was perfect for my new business artplacement.com.au to purchase a magnificent big black and white Tingari from the great man himself. The immaculate precision of this piece, painted specially at my request, will without a doubt, be a corner piece of the rental collection, as long as we can manoeuvre it’s 1900 x 1900mm frame into sometimes inaccessible client premises.

Please enjoy the progress shots, which I feel convey a real sense of calm and tranquility as Ronnie worked his way up and down the canvas.

Latest acquisition did not come quietly!

Not a huge piece, but really pulling a punch, is my latest Sally Gabori acquisition purchased from Dallas Gold’s gallery Raft Artspace in Alice Springs. Having sat on the floor in Dallas’s gallery pouring over vibrant, energetic, stunning pieces by Sally Gabori on a few occasions, this particular painting kept haunting me until I bought it.

For me it is Sally’s unabashed placement of colour, perfectly balanced by an adjudicating strip of white, somewhere in the composition. Measuring 1000 x 1500mm, I look forward to hanging it along side one of Sally’s other paintings 1500 x 2000mm in some confident client’s foyer or Boardroom!

Phyllis Thomas’s living art

Unlike most contemporary Aboriginal artists who use acrylic paint, Phyllis Thomas paints ochre on canvas.

Being a Kitja ochre artist, she paints Daiwal (Barramundi) Dreaming. In order to catch the fish, people throw leaves into the water to make the barramundi sleepy – they then rise to the surface and are easier to catch! The leaves turn the water a red colour – hence Phyllis has painted the scales of the fish using red ochre. The black canvas behind represents the women’s skin.

The image on the left shows the elder women of the Kitja community semi dressed and displaying the body paint of the Barramundi on the top half of their bodies, in anticipation of Women’s Business. I find the picture interested and yet somehow disturbing – did the women wear their bra’s to protect their own modesty or the sensibilities of the gathered crowd?